Top Most Frequently Asked Questions During Interviews in Ghana Fresh Deals Alert

Top Most Frequently Asked Questions During Interviews in Ghana

Hunting for job and getting it between them is INTERVIEW. You've been hunting for your dream job for all these years. Fortunately, a company has invited  you to attend interview but you could not get that job because you failed the interview. Your worries are over. In this master piece I will discuss most frequently asked questions and provide expected answers during interview section. 
While I don't recommend having a canned response for every interview question, I do recommend spending some time getting abreast with what you might be asked, what hiring managers are really looking for in your responses, and what it takes to show that you're the right man or woman for the job.
Consider this list your interview question study guide.

1. Can you tell me a little about yourself

This question seems simple, so many people fail to prepare for it, but it's crucial.What seems like such a simple question can really make you sweat, especially in an interview. Here's the deal: Don't give your complete employment (or personal) history. Instead give a pitch—one that’s concise and compelling and that shows exactly why you’re the right fit for the job. Start off with the 2-3 specific accomplishments or experiences that you




 most want the interviewer to know about, then wrap up talking about how that prior experience has positioned you for this specific role. A formula I really like to use is called the Present-Past-Future formula. So, first you start with the present—where you are right now. Then, segue into the past—a little bit about the experiences you’ve had and the skills you gained at the previous position. Finally, finish with the future—why you are really excited for this particular opportunity.

2. How did you hear about the position

Another seemingly harmless interview question, this is actually a perfect opportunity to stand out and show your passion for and connection to the company. For example, if you found out about the gig through a friend or professional contact, name drop that person, then share why you were so excited about it. If you discovered the company through an event or article, share that. Even if you found the listing through a random job board, share what, specifically, caught your eye about the role.

3. What do you know about the company

Any candidate can read and regurgitate the company’s “About” page. So, when interviewers ask this, they aren't necessarily trying to gauge whether you understand the mission—they want to know whether you care about it. Start with one line that shows you understand the company's goals, using a couple key words and phrases from the website, but then go on to make it personal. Say, “I’m personally drawn to this mission because…” or “I really believe in this approach because…” and share a personal example or two.

4. Why do you want this job

Again, companies want to hire people who are passionate about the job, so you should have a great answer about why you want the position. First, identify a couple of key factors that make the role a great fit for you (e.g., “I love customer support because I love the constant human interaction and the satisfaction that comes from helping someone solve a problem"), then share why you love the company .

5. Why should we hire you

This interview question seems forward , but if you're asked it, you're in luck: There's no better setup for you to sell yourself and your skills to the hiring manager. Your job here is to craft an answer that covers three things: that you can not only do the work, you can deliver great results; that you'll really fit in with the team and culture; and that you'd be a better hire than any of the other candidates.

6. What are your greatest professional strengths

When answering this question, interview coach Pamela Skillings recommends being accurate - share your true strengths, not those you think the interviewer wants to hear; relevant - choose your strengths that are most targeted to this particular position; and specific -for example, instead of “people skills,” choose “persuasive communication” or “relationship building”. Then, follow up with an example of how you've demonstrated these traits in a professional setting.

7. What do you consider to be your weaknesses

What your interviewer is really trying to do with this question—beyond identifying any major red flags—is to gauge your self-awareness and honesty. So, “I can't meet a deadline to save my life” is not an option—but neither is “Nothing! I'm perfect!” Strike a balance by thinking of something that you struggle with but that you’re working to improve. For example, maybe you’ve never been strong at public speaking, but you've recently volunteered to run meetings to help you be more comfortable when addressing a crowd.

8. What is your greatest professional achievement

Nothing says “hire me” better than a track record of achieving amazing results in past jobs, so don't be shy when answering this interview question! A great way to do so is by using the S-T-A-R method: Set up the situation and the task that you were required to complete to provide the interviewer with background context, but spend the bulk of your time describing what you actually did  and what you achieved. For example, “In one month, I streamlined the process, which saved my group 10 man-hours each month and reduced errors on invoices by 25%.”

9. Tell me about a challenge or conflict you've faced at work, and how you dealt with it.

In asking this interview question, “your interviewer wants to get a sense of how you will respond to conflict. Anyone can seem nice and pleasant in a job interview, but what will happen if you’re hired and Gladys in Compliance starts getting in your face?” says Skillings. Again, you'll want to use the S-T-A-R method, being sure to focus on how you handled the situation professionally and productively, and ideally closing with a happy ending, like how you came to a resolution or compromise.

10. Where do you see yourself in five years

If asked this question, be honest and specific about your future goals, but consider this: A hiring manager wants to know a) if you've set realistic expectations for your career, b) if you have ambition (a.k.a., this interview isn't the first time you're considering the question), and c) if the position aligns with your goals and growth. Your best bet is to think realistically about where this position could take you and answer along those lines. And if the position isn’t necessarily a one-way ticket to your aspirations? It’s OK to say that you’re not quite sure what the future holds, but that you see this experience playing an important role in helping you make that decision.

 11.What salary are you seeking

When you're asked, "What salary are you seeking?" it is to your advantage if the employer tells you the range first. Prepare by knowing the going rate in your area, and your bottom line or walk-away point. One possible answer would be: "I am sure when the time comes, we can agree on a reasonable amount. In what range do you typically pay someone with my background?"

12. Why are you leaving your current job

This is a toughest, but one you can be sure you'll be asked. Definitely keep things positive—you have nothing to gain by being negative about your past employers. Instead, frame things in a way that shows that you're eager to take on new opportunities and that the role you’re interviewing for is a better fit for you than your current or last position. For example, “I’d really love to be part of product development from beginning to end, and I know I’d have that opportunity here.” And if you were let go? Keep it simple: “Unfortunately, I was let go,” is a totally OK answer.

13. How do you handle stress and pressure 

What do you do when things don’t go smoothly at work? The best way to respond to this question is to give an example of how you have handled stress in a previous job. Describe a time when you were given a difficult task or multiple assignments, and you rose to the occasion

14. Describe a difficult work situation / project and how you overcame it.

The interviewer wants to know what you do when you face a difficult decision. As with the question about stress, be prepared to share an example of what you did in a tough situation.When answering these questions, give one or two concrete examples of difficult situations you have actually faced at work. Then discuss what decisions you had to make to remedy the situations.  A few of the most challenging decisions that people in mid-management and senior management have to make include:
  • Deciding who to terminate if layoffs become economically necessary
  • Terminating well-meaning but incompetent team members
  • Deciding who to promotion when you have several great candidates
  • Deciding whether you have to cut benefits that employees are used to receiving (like holiday bonuses) in order to help stabilize company finances

15. What are you looking for in a new position

   Ideally the same things that this position has to offer. Be specific.
Whenever you get asked this question during an interview, it’s impossible to not feel like it’s a trap. What other answer can you possibly give for, “What are you looking for in a new position?” other than, “Everything this one offers?”
Well, it depends on the humor of the hiring manager, but in general, that’s probably not your best option. To play it a little safer and to be thorough, follow these four steps. Remember, you want to be honest, but diplomatic. 
==> Start With Your Skill
==> Explain Your Motivation
==> Connect With Your Long-Term Goals
==> Wrap Up With Something About the Company
Never hesitate to call for One-On-One interview Training and Coaching.
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